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KC STAR CLASSICAL BEAT: Kansas City Symphony Chorus’ requiem will offer a balm for the soul

BY PATRICK NEAS | Special to The Star | May 11, 2018 04:19 PM | Updated May 11, 2018 04:19 PMCharles Bruffy will conduct the Kansas City Symphony Chorus in a free program Sunday, May 20, at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. Tim Trumble
Charles Bruffy will conduct the Kansas City Symphony Chorus in a free program Sunday, May 20, at the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. Tim Trumble

There are stormy requiems, like Mozart’s and Verdi’s, that raise the dead with thunder and earthquakes. And then there are requiems that confront mortality with calmness and serenity, like those of French composers Gabriel Fauré and Maurice Duruflé. The Kansas City Symphony Chorus conducted by Charles Bruffy will perform Duruflé’s gentle version of the Mass for the Dead on Sunday, May 20, at Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts.

The Kansas City Symphony Chorus will perform Maurice Duruflé’s requiem, “This Moment” by Kansas City composer Mark Hayes and “Lux Aeterna” by Morten Lauridsen. Talbott L. Wilson
Like Fauré, Duruflé took out the scary parts of the traditional requiem text (the “Dies Irae,” or “Day of Wrath”) and instead emphasized those words that bring solace, such as “Pie Jesu” and “In Paradisum.” Although Duruflé’s edited text is untraditional, the music is steeped in the ancient music of the church, Gregorian chant. Almost all the themes in Duruflé’s requiem are taken from the chants of the Gregorian Requiem, giving the work a timeless, mystical quality.

Bruffy has conducted the Duruflé requiem many times in his career and obviously feels a special connection to the work. His sensitivity to its subtle nuances promises a special, not-to-be-missed performance. Also on the program is “This Moment” by Kansas City composer Mark Hayes and “Lux Aeterna” by Morten Lauridsen.

As if all that weren’t enough, the concert is free. But you do need to reserve your tickets by phone or at the Kansas City Symphony’s website.

3 p.m. May 20. Helzberg Hall, Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. Free but tickets need to be reserved. 816-471-0400 or kcsymphony.org.

 

Read the full article on The Star website.